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  • Issue 12

    That’s the key question and we provide two distinct points of view. Rob Kaiser and Wanda Wallace say that women need to stop worrying about bias and take bigger chances in more strategic roles. Avivah Wittenberg-Cox says that it’s your fault if your company doesn’t have enough female talent, and you should stop “feel good” initiatives, take personal ownership for the issue and structure your company in a way that retains great female leaders.

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  • Issue 12

    The authors evaluated 25,000 managers and reached a startling conclusion: Women are more effective leaders than men. They’re rated as better by their peers, managers and direct reports, whether they are supervisors or SVPs, and no matter which region they work in. They rate higher than men on 13 of 16 leadership competencies but lower on two that may be telling – strategic perspective and professional expertise.

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  • Issue 12

    If you think you understand why women are underrepresented in leadership, think again. It’s not about capabilities, glass ceilings, personal interests or any of the typical excuses you’ll hear. Lusk and Sahm debunk the typical myths about female leaders and provide a five-step path to shifting your and your company’s mindset to a more fact-based place.

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  • Issue 12

    While most companies are talking about gender equality in leadership, these four are walking the talk. Their secrets may open doors for your female talent too. Learn the practical approaches taken by Strategy&, Cochlear, Telstra and a secret fourth company to address specific, solvable issues that were holding women back. You’ll learn that helping women leaders succeed doesn’t necessarily mean massive programs or numerical quotas. Sometimes, simple solutions work even better.

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  • Issue 12

    The corporate world is not a just and fair place for female talent. It’s time for women to accept that the system is rigged – and learn to beat it. That’s the crisp, aggressive message from frequent TQ contributor and Stanford University professor Jeffrey Pfeffer, who urges women to realize that they control their careers and to start acting like they do. Take Responsibility for Everything and Don’t Define Yourself in Less Powerful Ways are just two hard-hitting pieces of advice in this insight-laden article.

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  • Issue 12

    The corporate world is not a just and fair place for female talent. It’s time for women to accept that the system is rigged – and learn to beat it. That’s the crisp, aggressive message from frequent TQ contributor and Stanford University professor Jeffrey Pfeffer, who urges women to realize that they control their careers and to start acting like they do. Take Responsibility for Everything and Don’t Define Yourself in Less Powerful Ways are just two hard-hitting pieces of advice in this insight-laden article.

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  • Issue 11

    Canner holds leaders accountable for their cultures and says that “leaders who build great cultures focus on the whole institution, shaping companies where each facet of operations reinforces a vision not just for how the company should succeed, but how it should engage, look, think and feel.” He describes how companies like Chipotle and General Motors use culture to create a strong competitive advantage.

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  • Issue 11

    Longtime culture expert Katzenbach explains how we can apply four fundamental realities about culture including: 1) Emotional commitment trumps rational argument, 2) Enterprise cultures are complex emotionally, 3) Local cultural situations can rarely be avoided and 4) A “critical few” mindsets enables cultural alignment, to make our organizations even more effective.

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  • Issue 11

    It may seem a natural assumption that CEOs who fit with their organization’s culture would be more successful leaders than those who struggle to adapt and mesh. Not so fast say Hartnell and Kinicki, whose research finds that CEO leadership and culture tend to become similar over time and that this similarity actually reduces organization performance.

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  • Issue 11

    Wayne Brockbank & Dave Ulrich show how culture can change in five steps including 1) Define the Desired Culture, 2) Make the Culture Real to Customers, 3) Make the Culture Real to Employees, 4) Institutionalize Culture through HR Practices, and 5) HR Professionals can Help Business Leaders Model Culture. The authors urge the HR profession to move from the war on talent to the battle for culture.

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  • Issue 11

    We assign huge value to the impact of national culture but Sanger says other factors may be far more important drivers of leadership behavior. He suggests that broad descriptions of country groupings based on shared culture beliefs rarely predict leadership as well as simply looking at the influence of a specific country. He offers a more thoughtful approach to assessment.

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  • Issue 11

    What are the ingredients that make a company a truly great company? Ready believes he’s cracked the code with the concept of Collective Ambition that says great companies are Purpose-driven, Performance-oriented and Principles-led. He describes how Canadian bank RBC took a strong foundation of success and challenged themselves to examine their purpose in order to prepare for the changing competitiveness landscape.

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  • Issue 11

    A founding father of the concept of corporate culture, Ed Schein and co-author Peter Schein tell us that building a strong culture involves understanding how people align to it. He introduces the concept of Career Anchors – what drives a person’s motives, values and competencies – and suggests that people select Functional Competence, Pure Challenge, Autonomy or one of five other anchors as the non-negotiable reasons they engage with their company.

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  • Issue 11

    We discuss why lower performers actively try to sabotage higher performers and how country culture may not be as influential as traditional, strong leadership relationships.

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  • Issue 10

    Organizational Citizenship Behaviors are those that make us nicer to work with and create a more pleasant work environment. But recent research shows that engaging in OCBs maybe emotionally taxing, harder for women to manage and the domain of those who want to get ahead.

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  • Issue 10

    Gautrey describes that Political Capital is the theoretical value of goodwill that you have within your network of relationships. It includes your reputation, people’s positive experience of working with you, the amount of time and attention they will award you, and ultimately, the degree to which they are prepared to be influenced by you. Gautrey tells you how to manage all of those elements for maximum career impact.

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  • Issue 10

    If you want to improve performance management, stop playing with the parts of the process and focus instead on measuring and managing those doing the ratings. Beatty offers practical advice including, 1. Identify the goal of performance management and, 2. Don’t assume employees don’t want a process just because it currently doesn’t work well.

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  • Issue 10

    Dave Ulrich tells us that performance management faces a conundrum. Don’t do any performance management and accountability sloughs and performance lags; or build and implement complicated processes and frustration ensues and performance lags. His solution is to resolve the paradox by focusing more on positive accountability through conversation more than process.

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  • Issue 10

    90% of organizations fail to execute their strategies. That simple statistic has driven the authors’ professional interest for the past 20 years, leading to management tools such as the Balanced Scorecard, Strategy Maps, and Strategic Job Families. Norton, Kaplan and Frangos offer four clear processes to ensure your organization is among the 10%, including #1: Engagement: ensure that everyone understands the strategy.

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  • Issue 10

    Differentiation isn’t the secret sauce for organizational success, says well-known author and professor John Boudreau, who urges us to identify the (often) hidden few whose job performance truly drives organization outcomes. He says we should only differentiate if: 1.Differentiation makes a pivotal impact on valu¬able outcomes 2.Differentiation can be achieved with sufficient precision, reliability and accuracy 3.The cost of measurement does not exceed its value

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