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  • Issue 10

    Adler and Segal describe how performance management practices in most organizations are not specifically structured to attract, motivate, and retain stars. But they should be, according to the authors, who make a powerfully persuasive case for sharply differentiating your company’s investment in your highest performing and potential talent.

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  • Issue 10

    In an exclusive excerpt from their new book Learning Leadership, Kouzes and Posner describe why “Leadership is not some mystical quality that only a few people have and everyone else doesn’t. Leadership is not preordained,” and show us the “five myths that inhibit learning to lead and contribute most to the misunderstandings about what leadership is and isn’t.” In doing that, they bring the label of “great leader” within the grasp of all of your organization’s employees.

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  • Issue 10

    We often treat leaders as if they are a special class of individual. Thousands of books are written about leaders and how to be a better leader. But are leaders really that special? If the question surrounds impact, then yes. But in terms of their performance, the answer isn’t as clear. Harms investigates what leaders really do, if anything, to increase performance.

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  • Issue 10

    Agile talent is a new and exciting development in staffing and workforce management. What’s the upside of agile talent? Younger and Smallwood research’s points out five principal reasons executives give for increasing their reliance on agile talent as a source of critical expertise, including reducing costs and increasing the speed of getting things done. They describe how the field is evolving and how to integrate into your workforce strategy.

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  • Issue 9

    In this issue’s Start with the Science we explore some of the (very rare) science on engagement — most of which questions its very existence and challenges those consulting firms who claim it’s associated with better results.

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  • Issue 9

    Wallace and Wright find that engagement, particularly for women, is ultimately predicated on trust and that violations of trust can irreparably damage that relationship. They highlight how trust in an organization and a person’s network can be equally important and provide practical advice for ensuring that those engagement-driving activities actually occur.

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  • Issue 9

    Engagement can be defined in one word by many of today’s employees: Purpose. Lepisto says that 68% of employees think not enough is done to develop a common purpose in their organization and that professionals “crave the one thing most companies still don't explicitly offer them — purpose…” He explains how to define your organization’s purpose and use that to drive intrinsic engagement that produces sustained results.

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  • Issue 9

    Why are so many employees packing up and moving on? According to research by Career Systems International, the very thing that is most often compelling them to stay is the one thing well within the power of the organization and its leaders. Employees want opportunities to learn, grow and develop. Crowell and Kaye show how a supportive manager and great boss are the essential ingredients in high engagement.

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  • Issue 9

    World-renown executive coach and author Marshall Goldsmith suggests that you take responsibility for your own engagement. He believes that employees themselves are best positioned to do this and offers the “daily questions” process as a solution. These active questions reveal where someone is trying and where they are giving up and, in doing so, sharpen ones’ sense of what one can actually change.

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  • Issue 9

    Why does employee engagement drop 20% between an employee’s first day and their first year anniversary? Garrad and Hyland identify five factors that contribute to that fall including “trying to motivate employees” and “thinking engagement is a score on a survey.” They offer recommendations for addressing each mistake and pose four critical questions for you to consider.

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  • Issue 9

    Calling into question the popular folklore of dismal global engagement, Zenger and Folkman offer strong evidence that engagement is both stronger than believed and provide specific advice on the 10 factors companies can use to elevate it. They believe that managers influence those factors more than anything else and offer proof that focusing on managers’ capabilities is the surest, shortest path to higher engagement.

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  • Issue 9

    Drs. Castellano, Beatty and Beatty ask the tough questions about the value of engagement and propose a new approach for assessing it. Companies should be far more concerned with how employees engage with their company’s strategic levers of success rather than their satisfaction wit generic engagement factors. The authors offer suggestions for building out this company-specific engagement approach.

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  • Issue 9

    When engagement falls flat it’s likely due to overemphasizing organization-level solutions like extrinsic rewards and underemphasizing the role of the manager. Sorensen and Lusk recommend that companies focus on intrinsic motivators of engagement and stop using the “strengths” approach with their leaders – an mindset that can reduce leaders’ willingness to address their engagement-killing behaviors.

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  • Issue 9

    “Is Engagement Even Real?” and “Can Engagement be Changed?” are just two of the provocative questions Pepsico’s Allan Church asks and answers in this must-read primer on the topic. Church explains that measuring and working to improve engagement is a reasonable, but far from sufficient, strategy for managing talent and that other measures deliver far deeper and more useful insights.

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  • Issue 8

    We share the practical insights from some of the latest, most relevant science! In this issue we describe how narcissistic leaders manage to extract more salary for themselves vs. less narcissistic ones and how more ethical cultures effectively screen out narcissists.

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  • Issue 8

    Assessment expert Guenole shows us how to identify and analyze the dark side of personality especially in hiring situations. He provides great technical guidance for interpreting reports including the fact that angrier individuals may be more honest that others and reminding us that self-reports are open to a host of issues that may limit their effectiveness.

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  • Issue 8

    We can’t avoid the dark side of our co-workers, clients and ourselves, so psychologist Rob Kaiser provides practical strategies to deal with it. Kaiser uses the Hogan framework of “dark side” behaviors to show the strengths and weaknesses that each behavior brings, and discusses how to identify and correct when you’re likely to show those derailing behaviors.

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  • Issue 8

    From one of the world’s leading researchers on narcissism and poor leader behaviors, Leaders can be Lethal describes how our quest for, and trust in, leaders is often to our detriment. Maccoby presents historical examples including the bad (Napoleon, Hitler, etc.) and the good (Hewlett & Packard, William Mayo), and challenges us to consider whether today’s workforce will put up with leaders who offer protection at such a serious price.

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  • Issue 8

    The Director of Tuft University’s Mood Disorders Program urges us to redefine what’s meant by normal by describing the productive behaviors found towards the fringes of traditional definitions. Ghaemi explains how mildly manic moods allow people to think quickly and perhaps more creatively than others, while mild depression supports a very realistic and practical view of the world.

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  • Issue 8

    Author of classic business books including The Knowing-Doing Gap and Power, Pfeffer takes the leadership development industry to task for completely ineffective results in his new book LEADERSHIP BS. He describes how immodesty, self-promotion and unwarranted self-confidence are not only rife but thriving despite billions spent trying to develop leaders with other traits.

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